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Keynote Lectures

IoT-LAB - A First Class Scientific Tool for Large Scale IoT Experiments
Eric Fleury, INRIA Grenoble - Rhône-Alpes, France

i-sense - Early Warning Sensing Systems for Infectious Diseases
Ingemar Cox, University of Copenhagen, Denmark and University College London, United Kingdom

Implementation Considerations for Network Coding in Sensor Networks
Muriel Medard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States

IoT, Big Data & Smart Cities - The Untold Story
Mischa Dohler, King's College London, United Kingdom

 

IoT-LAB - A First Class Scientific Tool for Large Scale IoT Experiments

Eric Fleury
INRIA Grenoble - Rhône-Alpes
France
 

Brief Bio
Eric Fleury is a professor at ENS Lyon, Computer Science Department since 2007. The ENS Lyon is one of the four Ecoles normales supérieures in France (more about ENS Lyon...).. Eric Fleury is the scientific leader of the INRIA D-NET research team / INRIA Grenoble - Rhône-Alpes research centers . D-NET team is located at ENS Lyon and hosted by IXXI. Eric is also in the scientific board and in the steering comitee of the IXXI: Complex Systems Institute.
From 2003 to 2007, Eric Fleury was a professor at the INSA de Lyon.He received his Master degree in Computer science from Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France in 1992. He received his PhD, degree in Computer Science, 1996 in communication and routing in distributed architectures from Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon , and the Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches specializing in group communication in computer networks in 2002 from the Insa de Lyon. From 1998 to 2003, he was a full research officer at INRIA (the french national institute for research in computer science and control). First in the RESEDAS project in Nancy and then in the ARES project since 2002.

His research interests are in the area of wireless network (ad hoc, sensor), pervasive communication and next generation communication network. Until 2007, he was co-heading the INRIA ARES project and he was the co-director of the CITI Lab (Insa de Lyon). He is coordinator for ENS Lyon, UCBL and INSA de Lyon of the research cluster ISLE (n°2) Rhône-Alpes (Computer, Signal and embeded systems)

Professor Fleury was a Visiting Scientist at Michigan State University during the 1997/98 academic year in the research team of Professor Philip K. McKinley. He was the program chair or co-chair of the following events: ACM DIALM, IEEE MSA, AlgoTel. He was the editor of the proceedings of these conferences and is the author of a book chapter on active networking. He is involved in many research projects in wireless networks and autonomic networking in France and Europe. Since 2001, head of the ResCom Networking group (600 researchers) of the CNRS National Coopera- tive Structure « GDR ASR » on Architecture, Networks and Systems, member of the steering committee of the GDR ASR.

PhD Advisor of a dozen of candidates, all currently employed as research officers at Inria (G. Chelius, Nathalie Mitton), CNRS (F. Theoleyre), as assistant professors or in private R&D labs. Currents students are working on dynamic community uncovering, on Individual Based Investigation of Resistance Dis- semination and on Complex networks and overlapping community detection.

From September 2003 to September 2007, Professor Eric Fleury was the chair of the master in Networking, Telecommunications and Services inside the Master of research MaRIA of the University Lyon 1, INSA de Lyon, University Lyon 2, ECL.

From September 2007 to September 2009, Eric Fleury was the chair of the MASTER in fundamental computer science at ENS Lyon. Since September 2007 Eric Fleury is in charge of the new option in modeling complex systems for the Computer Science department. Since September 2009, Eric Fleury is the head of the Computer Science department of ENS Lyon


Abstract

In this talk, we present a precise description IoT-LAB. IoT-LAB provides a very large scale infrastructure facility suitable for testing small wireless sensor devices and heterogeneous communicating objects. IoT-LAB features over 2700 wireless sensor nodes spread across six different sites in France.  Nodes are either fixed or mobile and can be allocated in various topologies throughout all sites.  A variety of wireless sensors are available, with different processor architectures (MSP430, STM32 and Cortex-A8) and different wireless chips (802.15.4 PHY @ 800 MHz or 2.4 GHz).  In addition, “open nodes” can receive custom wireless sensors for inclusion in IoT-LAB testbed.

 IoT-LAB's main and most important goal is to offer an accurate open access multi-users scientific tool to support the design, development tuning, and experimentation of real large-scale sensor network/IoT applications. The hardware and software architectures that allow to reserve, configure, deploy embedded software, boot wireless sensor nodes and gather experimental data and monitoring information are described in detail. We also present demonstration examples to illustrate the use of the IoT-LAB testbed.

IoT-LAB is part of the FIT experimental platform, a set of complementary components that enable experimentation on innovative services for academic and industrial users.  The project -Future Internet of Things (FIT) – is one of 52 winning projects from the first wave of the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research’s “Équipements d’Excellence” (Equipex) research grant programme. The FIT project gives French Internet stakeholders a way to experiment with mobile wireless communications, both on network and application layers, thereby accelerating the design of advanced networking technologies for the Future Internet.



 

 

i-sense - Early Warning Sensing Systems for Infectious Diseases

Ingemar Cox
University of Copenhagen, Denmark and University College London
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Ingemar J. Cox is currently a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Copenhagen. He is also a  Professor in the  Department of Computer Science at University College London (UCL). He is  Head of the Future Media Group at UCL. Between 2003 and 2008, he was  Director of UCL's Adastral Park Campus.   He has been a recipient of a Royal Society Wolfson Fellowship (2002-2007).  He received his B.Sc. from University College London and Ph.D. from Oxford University. He was a member of the Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Labs at Murray Hill from 1984 until 1989 where his research interests were focused on mobile robots. In 1989 he joined NEC Research Institute in Princeton, NJ as a senior research scientist in the computer science division. At NEC, his research shifted to problems in computer vision and he was responsible for creating the computer vision group at NECI. He has worked on problems to do with stereo and motion correspondence and multimedia issues of image database retrieval and watermarking.  In 1999, he was awarded the IEEE Signal Processing Society Best Paper Award (Image and Multidimensional Signal Processing Area) for a paper he co-authored on watermarking.  From 1997-1999, he served as Chief Technical Officer of Signafy, Inc, a subsidiary of NEC responsible for the commercialization of watermarking.  Between 1996 and 1999, he led the design of NEC's watermarking proposal for DVD video disks and later colloborated with IBM in developing the technology behind the joint "Galaxy" proposal supported by Hitachi, IBM, NEC, Pioneer and Sony.  In 1999, he returned to NEC Research Institute as a Research Fellow.  He is a Fellow of the ACM, IEEE, the IET (formerly IEE), and the British Computer Society. He is a member of the UK Computing Research Committee. He was founding co-editor in chief of the IEE Proc. on Information Security and is an associate editor of the IEEE Trans. on Information Forensics and Security.  He is co-author of a book entitled "Digital Watermarking" and its second edition "Digital Watermarking and Steganography", and the co-editor of two books, `Autonomous Robots Vehicles' and `Partitioning Data Sets: With Applications to Psychology, Computer Vision and Target Tracking'.


Abstract

Infectious diseases remain a major threat to health and life. Pandemic influenza is considered a significant threat. In addition an estimated 1.7 billion people are TB-infected, 35 million people are HIV-infected, drug-resistant MRSA is major public health concerns, 2 million cases of cancer are caused by infections each year and infection is a major source of morbidity in primary care. Moreover emerging new infections can spread rapidly and unpredictably. For example, the CDC has recently estimated that the current Ebola outbreak has the potential to kill as many as 1.4 million people by the end of January 2015. In this context, there are increasing national and international drivers to dramatically improve our capacity to rapidly detect and respond to infectious disease threats by widening access to testing in community settings and a drive for innovative real-time surveillance. i-sense is a five year, £11m UK EPSRC-funded programme, launched in October 2013, to conduct research on early warning sensing systems for infectious diseases. Our vision is to engineer a new generation of early-warning sensing systems to identify disease outbreaks much earlier than before, using user-derived data available on the web and mobile phone-connected diagnostic tests based on new nano sensors. In this talk I will focus on i-sense’s efforts to analyse user derived data such as Twitter and search engine query logs for epidemiological purposes.  We will discuss prior work and its limitations, and discuss applications to (i) detection of disease outbreaks at mass gatherings, (ii) automatic hypothesis generation of online risks markers to health events, (iii) evaluation of an influenza health campaign, and (iv) estimation of secondary attack rates needed to model the spread of influenza.



 

 

Implementation Considerations for Network Coding in Sensor Networks

Muriel Medard
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
United States
 

Brief Bio
Muriel Médard is the Cecil H. Green Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. She was previously an Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and a member of the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. From 1995 to 1998, she was a Staff Member at MIT Lincoln Laboratory in the Optical Communications and the Advanced Networking Groups. Professor Médard received B.S. degrees in EECS and in Mathematics in 1989, a B.S. degree in Humanities in 1990, a M.S. degree in EE 1991, and a Sc D. degree in EE in 1995, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge. She has served as an Associate Editor for the Optical Communications and Networking Series of the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, the IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology and the OSA Journal of Optical Networking. She has served as a Guest Editor for the IEEE Journal of Lightwave Technology, the Joint special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory and the IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking on Networking and Information Theory and the IEEE Transactions on Information Forensic and Security: Special Issue on Statistical Methods for Network Security and Forensics. She serves on the board of Governors of the IEEE Information Theory Society as well as having served as President.


Abstract

The implementation of network coding in energy-challenged sensor networks, such body area networks, requires consideration of the energy cost of coding and the benefits that coding can provide in reducing the number of transmissions for successful reception. In this talk, we consider three different aspects of implementing network coding in body area networks, from low-level construction of modules in chips, to full circuit integration, to protocol design. The first concerns the choices of implementation of finite field arithmetic for network coding, trading off computational complexity for retransmission. The second issue considers the overall use of energy, when network coding and physical-layer error correction can be used in a complementary fashion. Finally, we consider energy use when coding is incorporated in the transmission protocol. Coding changes the way in which acknowledgements are managed, as well as forwarding in the types of simple relay scenarios that arise in body area networks.

 



 

 

IoT, Big Data & Smart Cities - The Untold Story

Mischa Dohler
King's College London
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Mischa Dohler is full Professor in Wireless Communications at King's College London, Head of the Centre for Telecommunications Research, co-founder and member of the Board of Directors of the smart city pioneer Worldsensing, Fellow and Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE, and Editor-in-Chief of the Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies.

He is a frequent keynote, panel and tutorial speaker. He has pioneered several research fields, contributed to numerous wireless broadband and IoT/M2M standards, holds a dozen patents, organized and chaired numerous conferences, has more than 200 publications, and authored several books. He has a citation h-index of 38 (top 1% in telecommunications).

He acts as policy, technology and entrepreneurship adviser, examples being Richard Branson's Carbon War Room, the House of Lords UK, the EPSRC ICT Strategy Advisory Team, the European Commission, the ISO Smart City working group, and various start-ups.

He is also an entrepreneur, angel investor, passionate pianist and fluent in 6 languages. He has talked at TEDx. He had coverage by national and international TV & radio; and his contributions have featured on BBC News and the Wall Street Journal.


Abstract
Based on my TEDx talk, this keynote will challenge some established hypes around smart cities but also outline opportunities and challenges for the coming years. From the many possible angles, I will focus on the urban Internet of Things (IoT), its underlying technologies, the resulting Open Data and Big Data opportunities, and surprising insights into how citizen perceive their Smart City. I will argue that we are still far off an “Internet” of things, mainly due to mistakes committed in the technology but also business developments over the past decade. I will then expose major research and design challenges which need to be addressed to facilitate a truly connected cyber-physical world, including issues related to Big Data, Open Data and Privacy. This talk is inspired by the numerous issues I have come across with when actually trying to facilitate smarter cities through Worldsensing. Along with the untold challenges, I will outline some viable steps to address these in the hope to facilitate the emergence of truly smart cities.



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